Time Flashing Away

Lost electricity last night so my first order of business this a.m. is to go around and reset all the clocks flashing 12:00.  Led (no pun intended) me to wonder why you have to reset ’em whenever you lose electricity.  Found this explanation:
The way time is shown on a digital clock comes through a method that uses a seven-segment display. When the segments are combined in different patterns, it results in illustrating the rectangular-shape Hindu-Arabic numerals (numbers 0 to 23 in the 24-hour system and 0 to 9 in the 12-hour system) that are displayed on a digital clock. A piece built into the clock called a binary number to seven-segment display converter is designed to detect the number that should come up next and demonstrates the appropriate pattern to display that number. There are other elements that need to be added to the clock to get AM/PM indicators, day and date settings and alarm modes. After a power failure, if there is no backup battery installed, it is common to see a digital clock with a flashing display after losing its setting. Newer clocks being built can be designed with a function to reset themselves based on radio or Internet time signals. (from   http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4926444_digital-clocks-work.html#ixzz30viE57nO
Still not sure I really understand why we need to reset the damn clocks. Like the answer says though, good news is that you can now find clocks with battery backup that solve this (click here.)

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Time Flashing Away

Lost electricity last night so my first order of business this a.m. is to go around and reset all the clocks flashing 12:00.  Led (no pun intended) me to wonder why you have to reset ’em whenever you lose electricity.  Found this explanation:
The way time is shown on a digital clock comes through a method that uses a seven-segment display. When the segments are combined in different patterns, it results in illustrating the rectangular-shape Hindu-Arabic numerals (numbers 0 to 23 in the 24-hour system and 0 to 9 in the 12-hour system) that are displayed on a digital clock. A piece built into the clock called a binary number to seven-segment display converter is designed to detect the number that should come up next and demonstrates the appropriate pattern to display that number. There are other elements that need to be added to the clock to get AM/PM indicators, day and date settings and alarm modes. After a power failure, if there is no backup battery installed, it is common to see a digital clock with a flashing display after losing its setting. Newer clocks being built can be designed with a function to reset themselves based on radio or Internet time signals. (from   http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4926444_digital-clocks-work.html#ixzz30viE57nO
Still not sure I really understand why we need to reset the damn clocks. Like the answer says though, good news is that you can now find clocks with battery backup that solve this (click here.)

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